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differences. let's take a look at them. the gop plan would cut the deficit $4.6 trillion over ten years, all through spending cuts. the democratic plan would cut the deficit $1.8 trillion half through spending cuts and half through tax hikes. senator corker, let me start with you will senate republicans accept a tax increase if you get serious entitlement reform and cuts? >> i think senate republicans and all republicans want to see a 75 year solution to entitlements and i think republicans are joined in wanting to see tax reform so to the extent that generates revenues and how that is scored obviously that will be debated as we move ahead but i think all of us understand the real issues driving the deficit is in our o country are the entitlements. we want to see these available for generations to come. >> chris: but real quickly you you understand the price for entitlement reform in any deal would be a tax increase. would you buy that and what do you think are the prospects there willle be a deal sometime before this summer? >> well, again, i think there by the way is a chance on a deal. i
and then on the deficit this year, the democrat deficit would be 164 billion dollars bigger than the republican deficit. and next year, 308 billion dollars, just to give you a sense of it, by 2015 the republican deficit would be down to 125 billion and the democrat deficit 433 billion. there's a big indication of the difference between the parties when you look at the budgets of the budget blueprints of the republicans in the house and the democrats in senate and republicans want to restrain spending and democrats want to continue to blow up the budget and eventually, over the decade add 1 trillion dollars of new taxes. >> sean: yeah, so 1 trillionew a trillion dollars, this is like they know no other way, all right? that's point one, but yet, they still will give us almost trillion dollar deficits as far as the eye can see throughout the entire ten-year period. here is the big issue though, i want to see obamacare repealed, but it's not going to happen through paul ryan's budget plan. the republicans, if they want that to happen, to get ryan's plan through, they're going to have to during one of the c
introduce $20 billion in additional taxes this year and $40 billion in new taxes next year. so the deficit under the democratic senate budget proposal which only thing we've got at this point, calls for more spending and more taxes and bigger deficits. that is not where the american people are. recent polls this week showed that 55% of the american people favored the republican budget plan. if you took the word republican off of it and simply described would you support a budget that balances the budget and raises no taxes and cuts $5 trillion of them favor that 55% to 24% that budget that would raise taxes by a trillion and cut spending by hundred billion and not balance the budget which is what the democratic budget calls for. >> greta: we are 18 months out from the 2014 election. we have the house has passed a budget and senate has passed a budget. it will go to a conference for reconciliation. both parties have made it sent tral focus of 2014. it is a signal they are more interested in winning and making sorted smear each other's face with each other budget rather than drawing common g
and millions of americans who say that the economy is the main issue. second to the economy is the deficit. it goats back to the fundamental issue of moderation. this is the achilles' heel for the republican party. everything is just black and white. whereas most folks, most americans in the middle believe in moderation. whether we do our own taxes or finances, we sit down and figure out, how do we cut a little here, save alternates there, increase revenue? so the problem with the republican party is they're out of step how most of us work on a day-to-day basis. that's something that the president has been so good at reflecting in his bigger vision of deficit reduction and the economy as a bigger issue. >>> clarence, you still here boehner say no new ref, though the american people are saying new revenue. they're saying we don't have an immediate crisis, but we need immediate cuts. why are we cutting head start and other things immediately if there's no immediate problem. a new republican leaning poll, a republican-leaning poll says just 16% of americans said the deficit and the debt with
, it is unexamined on some level. secondarily, if you say deficit reduction, the partisan are leeched out. we are talking about whether it will work to balance the budget. if along the way 35 million become uninsured, that's sad but we don't talk about it because cbo didn't mention it in the score. that's the great trick of paul ryan to recognize if you only talk about budget deficit, where does your budget put the deficit 20, 30 years from now, the amount of things you sneak in under that cloak that you can never put into the conversation in a serious way in normal times is tremendous. that's the central political innovation of his career. >> the favorite thing in the accounting discussion is compare the government to a family, saying you couldn't -- well, families do run debt, they cannot afford to buy their houses for cash, so they have a thing called a mortgage, which is the national debt of the family in effect. they try to oversimplify everything in this, but is there some break through in this point of republicans saying you know what, the debt isn't such a serious problem? >> there's
, this is all washington talks abou about, which is deficits and budgets. and you could argue that, in terms of the goalposts, we're arguing in and around the rand paul budget or paul ryan budget. and there was very little news of the house caucus budget. which should be the flag around which democrats rally, given the stream opposition. >> the progressive caucus budget is the most responsible budget that's been presented. i think even more than patty murray's budget. the senate democratic budget. but you're right. it doesn't get attention, because inside the beltway, the fixation is on deficit reduction, and that's by conservatives who somehow buy the idea that government is going to crush us if we don't drastically cut now. i don't think they want to kus as much as rand paul wants to cut. and you were right to highlight that part of his budget, increasing the retirement age and privatizing medicare, because i think that's the part of his budget that's going to really crash his 2016 hopes. but to get back to 2014, you know, it's going to be up to obama, particularly, to lead the charge. he'
in deficit reduction. there's plenty of room to cut more. and plenty of room to raise revenue and that's part of any big package. >> you heard senator corker, lay ought, if they give this, we'll give this as well. entitlements is what he's saying on the democratic side. what would you be open to? >> i'd be open to reducing costs in medicare. i think the affordable care act made a good down payment that way in reducing payments to medicare advantage plans. we can reduce overpayments to pharmaceuticals. and we can put costs by focusing on making sure the services are deliverable rather than paying for the number of services. there are ways to bring down costs without attacking the benefits under medicare. social security, a little more difficult. i think many of us would support raising the lid at which payroll taxes are paid into the system. that would help preserve social security for another generation. so there are changes democrats have been willing to embrace to reduce costs to raise revenues to support those programs. but we need a willing partner on the other side. and in the house we d
about deficit reduction that it is a misplaced focus, that the real priority should be on job creation. but it seems that too many people in congress who just think the most important thing is to cut cut cut. so is the deficit really the most thant thing? is the deficit out of control, or is job korea payings more important? >> chris van hollen is right. we have over 40 million american families living in poverty. these numbers carry with them a really human toll. so if we want to be looking at the long-term success of the u.s. economy, then balancing the budget in the short term is a really short-term mistake. >> bill: in other words the best thing we could do to grow the economy is put people back to work. >> yes, and make the sorts of investments that will get people to work today, take a look at pre-k. you are not only employing a lot more full-time teachers but at the same time you are investing in future workers. >> bill: how can it be that you have got -- again, the dough -- these new record highs, corporate profits record high financial institutions are back
class. at least we have a budget now and at least democrats now can show that deficit reduction can be done responsible. responsibly. >> the lack of a bunt has been an effective talking point for republicans. why do you think they haven't reached an agreement? >> because they're democrats. they have a hard time reaching an agreement about anything. that's why they're democrats. the progressive caucus shows that it is possible to reduce the budget deficit by taking even more away from big corporations reducing corporate welfare to an even larger extent reigning in tax loopholes, and so-called tax expenditures. the democratic budget and senate budget is a very good place to begin. i think the progressive caucus's budget is much better. >> analysts are saying this budget is to the left of obama. many on the left would say we should have expected that. does this give the president the opportunity to bring people together and get some sort of grand bargain by throwing things less liked under the bus. >> there is not going to be a grand bargain. the right wing controls the republican part
you need to deal with it budgets and deficits and you need to keep growth going. here is what i saw over the weekend. recession in greece which is a actually a depression if you line it up against the u.s. great depression in 1929 it looks a lot a like in terms of how much unemployment there send a how much the economy was contracted. greece is having our great depression of the late 1920s. >> wow. >>> moving on to washington now. president obama's renewed push for a grand bargain may be showing some early signs of paying off, at least with one top republican. senator bob corker of tennessee says he could envision raising tax revenue if democrats embrace big changes to medicare and social security. he is at odds with other members of his party including house speaker john boehner who is ruling out the prospect of any new taxes. >> i think, by the way, there is a chance on a deal. i know the president is saying the right things and we have an opportunity over the next four to five months. i think republicans, if they saw true entitlement reform would be glad to look at tax reform tha
and deficit thing. another is that i think the republican party has to make clear what its foreign policy is. it has had two wars for the past 12 years, people are still settling in and thinking, the voters have said, we don't like that. we're not for that. the republican party has to make clear what it stands for and it is going to have a little bit of debate to get there. those two big things and the policies that spring from them will make all of the difference, so will an eventual compelling presidential candidate. somebody who is involved right now. at the end of the day, it's the candidates who resolve a lot of unresolved things by taking a stand and speaking forcefully for it. >> that was bill clinton after walter mondale lost it. after jimmy carter lost. we had a dynamic governor who was reformed minded and brought those issues into the national forefront. he really helped recharge the democratic party. you know, the republican party is out to lunch. i watched cpac, karl. karl was a former friend. >> i thought i was a current friend? >> you're always a friend, you owe me some chili.
of spending decisions that add up to massive debt and deficit. tonight, there is a week-long series on what to cut. >> government is not the solution to the problem. government the problem. >> rare of big government is over. >> every president called to streamline federal bureaucracy but none succeeded. >> government is largeer than it ever has been. the debt is growing at record rate. >> adjusted for inflation. government spending went up from $882 billion spent every year in 1980s to $1.48 trillion in the 1990s. $2.24 trillion a year and the first decade of the 21st century. mast ited that government will have spent almost as much in the first four years as a new decade as in the 1990s. >> in the past there bar crisis like world war ii or the korean war, nondefense spending was cut by 20 to 30%. >> that didn't happen after 9/11 or after the financial crisis. >> nothing typifies the expansion of government as much as the growing wealth of the washington, d.c. area. region with few neutral resources and little manufacturerring to produce well. the average government worker compensation is o
billion deficit. they don't want to get to where stock toeupbs righ stockton is right now so they are under this emergency pherg, state control. a lot of people have scheduled a protest today, are being called for to protest this move. what exactly wha will he be responsible for? >> slicing and dicing. cutting salaries of city employees. detroit already has a high crime rate. you don't want what happened to stockton, just like matt said they have per capita more murders in the city of chicago. how is that possible, little stockton? if you look at the map in california everybody was moving out in san francisco, properties were too high there, same with palo at torques silicon valley, they moved to stockton. what could happen in detroit unless they start cutting more. if detroit has to file for chapter 9 bankruptcy municipal that would make headlines around the world and kind prus would be booted off the front page. >> that's what they are trying to do and -- >> the mayor and the city council loose all the authority they shr-fplt they've been trying and they can't do that. the
and iraq were fought as quote emergencies, which means they weren't included in the annual deficits. so, now, when they're talking about a budget that cuts student loan programs for gi members, people coming back from iraq and afghanistan now they're not getting their student loans. because this was all fought off budget. i think that's political malpractice on the part of the republican party. they should have budgeted for this. >> well, from a congressional physician of the soul like diana degette, thank you so much. now to dr. james peterson, msnbc analyst and director of africana st studies. professor, millions oppose the war, but as you know, and i'm sure you remember, their voices were significantly marginalized. give us a sense of how that happened. >> there's a lot of context here. we have to start with the fact that the sort of american ethos in response to 9/11 was a sort of patriotism, people not in line with the government and a very war hawkish administration seemed to be anti-american. so in that environment, the voices that were speaking out against this war, but in that
saying we want a lot more spending, most of it paid for by deficit this year and next. we'll see a lot of defectses from the democrat budget resolution. we saw a vote yesterday in the senate which was, you talked with stuart varney about. repealing the medical device tax. we're likely to see a lot of defects from the white house and the democratic leadership proposal to have a lot more spending in year and coming years. we saw the opening mark of that yesterday. bill: peter cottontail still on the schedule for the 1st of april. we'll bring you back and we'll continue this little discussion about what's right and what's not given the budget crunch. >> bring back the white house tours. bring back the white house tours. bring back the white house tours. there we go. bill: enjoy austin. see you soon. heather. heather: the clock is ticking as the country is on a verge of collapse. can a deal be reached before there is a i had on people's bank accounts and is this something we could see happen to your bank account? bill: also a scared homeowner, well, you won't believe what they did when a h
president obama and republicans reach a long-term agreement on reducing the deficit? >> the answer, different depending on which republican you ask. house speaker john boehner doesn't sound very hopeful. he's standing firm against the idea of increasing tax rates, increasing tax revenue. >> the president believes that we have to have more taxes from the american people. we're not going to get very far. if the president doesn't believe that the goal ought to be to balance the budget over the next ten years, i'm not sure we're going to get very far. and this is the whole issue. we have a spending problem here in washington, and it's time to solve the problem. >> we're hearing different things coming from various republicans, including senator bob corker. he's a republican of tennessee. he says he's optimistic about the possibility of what's called a grand bargain, and he's open to the idea of raising tax revenues to cut the deal under certain circumstances. senator corker's joining us now from capitol hill. senator, thanks very much for coming in. >> good to be with you, wolf, thank
spending but leaves the government with $566 billion in annual deficits over the next ten years. the house plan balances the budget by 2023 with big cuts in domestic spending and major changes to medicare and the tax code. charlie rangel, new york's most famous congressman, is here with me. former chair of the house ways and means committee. start with the chasm between the two plans. is there room for compromise at all between the senate and house plan? >> the major difference is that, obama and most of the country that voted for him really thinks that a time of recession that we're coming out of it that we should be creating jobs and not laying off people just with cuts. that is the difference. the major difference between the senate and the house. republicans say no taxes, no money, no investment. well, that's absolutely ridiculous. in order to get people back to work and having disposable income, you've got to invest in education, the infrastructure, the bridges and the tunnels. there's no money in the republican, because they say that we're taking care of revenues. where the heck that
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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